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Subtle forms of domestic abuse

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Subtle forms of domestic abuse

| Jan 25, 2021 | domestic abuse | 0 comments

Abuse within a relationship does not always involve bruises or demeaning language. Some subtle forms of abuse can be difficult to detect, even when you experience these behaviors in your marriage. 

Familiarize yourself with less-obvious types of domestic abuse if you have concerns about your spouse’s treatment of you. 

Interfering with smart home technology

Your spouse may attempt to control you through the smart technology in your home. Many modern couples have Wi-Fi doorbells and locks, thermostats, security systems, lights, entertainment systems, and even appliances. Blocking you from using these items by changing the password or monitoring your activities through these systems represent abusive actions. 

Controlling your life

Does your spouse check on you with cameras in your home? Does he or she review your odometer to see if you are lying about your location? Is your phone and computer up for inspection anytime your spouse wants to invade your privacy? These are just a few forms of controlling behavior that arise in abusive relationships. 

Isolating you from family and friends

Abusive partners often prevent their spouses from spending time with trusted confidants. Eventually, you may feel like you have no one to turn to if you leave your marriage. In extreme cases, your spouse may insist that you move to a city or state where you have no support network. 

When your relationship involves this type of behavior, you may fear your partner but struggle to leave. Unfortunately, controlling and isolating behavior often escalates to other types of abuse. In Minnesota, you can obtain an order of protection if you are afraid your spouse may harm you.